Who Knew?

Screen Shot 2017-04-27 at 12.38.28 PMOn the surface, Richard F. Libin’s Who Knew? is a commonsense guide to the somewhat lost art of salesmanship. The problem, as Libin describes it, is that even seasoned salespeople have lost sight of what selling is about. In his words, “Most people believe that selling something means persuading someone to purchase a product or a service. This is where salespeople and sales in general start to fail. Effective selling starts with the customer, not with what you are trying to sell.” In other words, sales isn’t about products. It’s about people. And while good salespeople certainly have expertise about the products and services they are selling, the best have greater expertise in relating to others.

Appropriately, Who Knew? is as much a guide to selling as it is a guide to relationships, and Libin’s advice is applicable to people in all walks of life. What’s more, it’s easy to understand. Whether he’s extolling the power of positive thinking, sharing anecdotes from his own experience as both a salesperson and a customer, or proffering strategies for improving one’s listening skills, Libin comes across as a down-to-earth, practical tutor whose aim is to share his experience. Reading his book is like being with someone who’s been in the trenches, has no plans of leaving them, and is now on hand to help anyone who needs some advice.

Ultimately, Libin’s is a gospel of mindfulness. In sales as with everything else in life, we need to be present in all of our dealings. Or, in Libin’s words, to succeed, “You must be 100% in the game and ready to work with a single-minded focus for each client.” A tall order in a world that’s increasingly filled with all sorts of distractions, but one worth heeding nonetheless.

An excellent primer for anyone considering a job in sales or looking to brush up on their sales practices, Who Knew? also works as a practical handbook for the myriad social exchanges we all experience in everyday life.

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